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Bobby

About Bobby Dye

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So far Bobby Dye has created 9 blog entries.

Heritage Boatworks 2021 Boat Drawing

2021-11-10T13:43:03-05:00November 10th, 2021|

The Heritage Boatworks boat drawing is a tradition held on Luminary Night every year. This year, the event will take place on Wednesday, December 1st, from 6 to 9 p.m. Heritage Boatworks is a group of volunteers dedicated to keeping the art and skill of wooden boatbuilding alive in St. Augustine. Throughout 2021, volunteers from Heritage Boatworks, a Nation's Oldest Port® program at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum, worked diligently to create two [...]

Lighthouse Illuminations

2021-10-25T10:03:53-04:00October 25th, 2021|

https://youtu.be/N-zDEvYYHvE Visit the Museum during Nights of Lights for Tides, Tidings, and Trees. Daytime general admission tickets get you in the door to enjoy seasonally decorated grounds and buildings. As the sun goes down, purchase after-hours Lighthouse Illumination tickets for an extraordinary experience. Explore the Keepers’ house and grounds illuminated by lights and garlands, and enjoy a sensational view of the Lighthouse’s night mark. Spots are filling up quickly, as there’s limited availability! PURCHASE YOUR [...]

Crescent Beach Shipwreck: The Caroline Eddy

2021-10-11T14:29:11-04:00October 11th, 2021|

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBJJirfR2wc (Drone footage courtesy of Eric Wilson, LAMP Volunteer) The entirety of the Crescent Beach Shipwreck Maritime archaeologists from the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum’s research arm, Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), have documented the entirety of the Crescent Beach Shipwreck site. In November 2020, LAMP was notified of a previously unknown shipwreck that had become exposed on the southern end of Crescent Beach. Local beachgoers noticed the wooden wreckage and posted pictures on [...]

A new Barca Chata and a History of Boatbuilding in St. Augustine

2021-08-03T10:45:12-04:00August 2nd, 2021|

Heritage Boatworks, a Nation’s Oldest Port® program at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum, just finished a Barca Chata, which is Spanish for flatboat. This simple flat-bottomed boat design saw widespread use in colonial America and continued through the beginning of the 20th century. Heritage Boatworks, a volunteer-run program dedicated to keeping the tradition of boatbuilding alive in St. Augustine, also made a separate Barca Chata, which was recently donated to Fort Mose Historic [...]

Seagulls on Patrol

2021-08-03T09:36:10-04:00July 12th, 2021|

When we think of U.S. Naval Aviation, most of us immediately picture the mighty aircraft carriers, decks bristling with a wide array of aviation assets that can take to the sky at a moment’s notice. But aircraft carriers, as impressive as they are, are not the only vessels to launch and recover aircraft while underway at sea. In fact, they were not the first to do so either. Navies worldwide began launching and recovering aircraft [...]

Florida’s Women Go to War

2021-08-03T09:35:45-04:00March 31st, 2021|

At one point in history, it was unheard of for women to go to war. The movie industry reinforced depictions of the stereotypical wife or sweetheart remaining home, crying into her hanky while her man went off to war, time and time again. The actual reality of those times is anything but that. It is estimated between 400 and 750 women disguised themselves as men and fought on the front lines during the American Civil [...]

One a Day in Tampa Bay

2021-03-10T10:20:19-05:00March 10th, 2021|

Tragedy at MacDill AFB Situated strategically four miles south of Tampa, Florida, at the end of a peninsula that separates Old Tampa Bay from Hillsborough Bay is MacDill Air Force Base. Established on May 24th, 1939, for the Army Air Corps, it was initially called Southeast Air Base, Tampa. The base has overseen a variety of missions that continue today. However, this article focuses on only a short period at the outbreak of World War [...]

The 1760 British Yawl: Evolution of a Ship’s Boat

2021-08-10T12:40:28-04:00January 19th, 2021|

Pearl Harbor Day’s annual remembrance on Dec. 7 generally sends me searching for images from that horrible attack. Visiting the Pearl Harbor Naval Memorial in Hawaii some years ago was one of the most memorable moments of my life, as I gazed down at the hull of the U.S.S. Arizona, trying to imagine what it was like years before. I remember sitting outside by the harbor and listening intently to stories about that day from two Navy [...]

Shrimpin’ Ain’t Easy

2021-07-09T13:36:57-04:00January 12th, 2021|

The First Coast of Florida, in addition to being the first U.S. coast to be settled by Europeans, was the first coast to foster a commercial shrimping industry. Spreading from Fernandina to St. Augustine in the early 20th century, following the expansion of the railroad built by capitalist Henry Flagler, the nascent commercial shrimping and shrimpboat-building industries were dominated by a number of innovative families of Mediterranean descent–including the Salvador, Versaggi, and Poli families. 1947 [...]