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Conservation

Stuck at Home: Virtually Visit the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum

2020-03-28T09:00:17-04:00March 28th, 2020|

#LoveYourLighthouse Your St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum is closed to protect you and your lighthouse family from COVID-19. While we are closed, we invite you to take virtual tours of the lighthouse and museum in the following YouTube videos. Your Gift of Love for our Maritime Heritage Makes A Difference. Donate today, or take advantage of deep discount opportunities by visiting www.staugustinelighthouse.org. Stay Safe and #LoveYourLighthouse Tour the St. Augustine Lighthouse with Head Lighthouse Keeper Rick [...]

Ivory Lice Comb found on 1782 shipwreck

2019-07-30T15:09:53-04:00July 30th, 2019|

This lice comb was found in a concretion from the Storm shipwreck, a 1782 American Revolutionary War shipwreck excavated by St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum archaeologists and students from 2009-2017. View other artifacts from this shipwreck in WRECKED!, an exhibit in the Keepers' House at the Museum. Read more about the shipwreck here. View artifacts in the WRECKED! exhibit which were found on the 1782 American Revolutionary War shipwreck. This photo shows artifacts in [...]

Slideshow: 1924 Time Capsule Scroll

2018-10-02T13:32:31-04:00October 2nd, 2018|

A 1924 Time Capsule was unearthed on Thursday, September 27 at Jacksonville's Memorial Park, containing a scroll of 1,220 names of Floridians who died in WWI. The time capsule was brought to the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum's conservation lab on Friday, September 28 due to water intrusion. On Monday, October 1, the Conservation team at the Museum, along with expert paper conservator Ann Siebert, opened the copper box containing the scroll. See PHOTOS below [...]

What ‘shoe’ don’t know about archaeological shoe fragments 

2018-08-07T14:59:11-04:00August 7th, 2018|

These shoe buckles are on view in the Conservation Lab at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum. By Elise Carroll Assistant Archaeological Conservator Many significant pieces of history are often over looked because of the regularity of the items occurring. Bright, shiny, seemingly significant objects, such as cannon and coins take center stage, while mundane utilitarian items are often overlooked because of their everyday use. Unsurprisingly, many of the archaeological sites we [...]

Updates from the Lab

2018-05-01T13:15:43-04:00May 1st, 2018|

While our beautiful new Maritime Archaeology and Education Center (MAEC) was being built, conservation was disassembled and all artifacts were put into a state of monitored wet storage. Taking those items out of storage and getting conservation back on track has been a slow and detailed process. This process requires an inventory and condition analysis of all items, as well as setting up each area of conservation in order for treatments to begin. Though we [...]

Discoveries at the Barracks

2018-03-21T16:11:54-04:00March 21st, 2018|

The World War II-era United States Coast Guard (USCG) structure on site is currently being restored after serving as office space for many years at the Museum. The structure was constructed after the US entered into World War II. Before December 1941, the US military was in various stages of mobilization that included increasing military personnel, munitions and equipment. The official telegram that head keeper Daniels received, which initiated a military mobilization plan that [...]

Conservation Around Site – Harpoon

2017-03-15T08:00:01-04:00March 15th, 2017|

People have hunted whales around the world for thousands of years, primarily for meat and blubber. In America, the practice really took off in the colonial 18th century and hit its peak in the mid-19th. The most lucrative product at this point was whale oil, derived from boiling down blubber or harvesting the head of sperm whales. As the American industry grew and expanded, so did the whaling practices and technology, which is where our [...]

Clothing Mysteries

2016-10-26T08:00:54-04:00October 26th, 2016|

The vast majority of artifacts that come through conservation are from our shipwrecks excavated by LAMP. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of objects from the Storm and Anniversary wrecks waiting to be worked on. However, conservation activities for the LAMP sites have slowed down as we pack up and organize for the new building construction. There was also a little event called Hurricane Matthew that stifled conservation duties. We boarded up the Light [...]

Sifting through the muck

2016-09-28T08:00:17-04:00September 28th, 2016|

Every year, our research arm, the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), heads out on the water to either survey for new wrecks, target test potential anomalies from said surveys or locate and excavate archaeological sites underwater. How exactly does LAMP work underwater and get the artifacts for the conservation team? Unlike a “traditional” land site, we cannot simply dig up the dirt and move it to the side with shovels and wheelbarrows. We instead do [...]

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